Use Facilitated Dialogue

Implementing

To implement facilitated dialogue in a Cooking Matters course, use the following tools:

Assess learners’ objectives 

Assessing learners’ objectives in Cooking Matters classes is a way to recognize individuals’ interests and to help ensure that content will be relevant to learners. 

Set ground rules to encourage respectful sharing 

The following video describes how to put this tool into action! 

Use a “bike rack” 

Acknowledge ideas or objectives that are off-topic from the lesson or course objectives by “parking” these topics. The “bike rack” (also known as a “parking lot”) serves as a reminder to incorporate the topics at a more appropriate time.  How do you create a “bike rack”?  It’s as simple as using a piece of paper or chalk board to write down a list of topics which you plan to revisit later if time allows.

Ask open-ended questions

The value of open-ended questions is tremendous. Asking open-ended questions takes some practice, but it’s the easiest way to engage learners and allow them to find personal meaning in information. One way you can incorporate these questions into actions is to demonstrate what you’re doing with dialogue, by asking participants why you’re doing what you’re doing. For example, Why would I want to use warm to hot water to wash my hands?

Want to learn more about asking open-ended questions? Click HERE for more information.  

Provide choices

A final tool for facilitated dialogue is to provide participants with choices so that they feel empowered to consider options that may lead to positive improvements in their lives. For more on how to provide choices to participants, click HERE

Troubleshooting

There can be a downside to using facilitated dialogue. Below are some common difficulties, along with ways to get around them:

Potential Downside

Potential Solution

More likely for the dialogue to get off track

  • Start class by identifying / reviewing objectives with learners
  • Use a “bike rack” to acknowledge and remember to revisit ideas or questions
  • Make time-check announcements and remind learners about core objectives

More likely for misinformation to be shared.

  • Thank speaker for their contribution and gently correct them
  • Emphasize the worth of the speaker’s experience and ask others about their experience

Not enough time to get through the lesson objectives.

  • Move content to next class
  • Meet learners’ needs – if necessary, let an agenda item go!
  • Employ the “bike rack” strategy if you find the group straying off topic

Requires more planning and preparation.

  • Shadow great instructors to see how classes run before you start out on your own
  • Practice cooking recipes ahead of time to look for potential ways to save time during class

Quiet participants may be less likely to participate in the dialogue.

  • Involve quiet participants in other ways, such as cooking, cleaning or working in small groups

 

Now that you know about facilitated dialogue, let’s PRACTICE!

Click HERE to test your skills in asking open-ended questions.

 


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Use Facilitated Dialogue

Implementing

To implement facilitated dialogue in a Cooking Matters course, use the following tools:

Assess learners’ objectives 

Assessing learners’ objectives in Cooking Matters classes is a way to recognize individuals’ interests and to help ensure that content will be relevant to learners. 

Set ground rules to encourage respectful sharing 

The following video describes how to put this tool into action! 

Use a “bike rack” 

Acknowledge ideas or objectives that are off-topic from the lesson or course objectives by “parking” these topics. The “bike rack” (also known as a “parking lot”) serves as a reminder to incorporate the topics at a more appropriate time.  How do you create a “bike rack”?  It’s as simple as using a piece of paper or chalk board to write down a list of topics which you plan to revisit later if time allows.

Ask open-ended questions

The value of open-ended questions is tremendous. Asking open-ended questions takes some practice, but it’s the easiest way to engage learners and allow them to find personal meaning in information. One way you can incorporate these questions into actions is to demonstrate what you’re doing with dialogue, by asking participants why you’re doing what you’re doing. For example, Why would I want to use warm to hot water to wash my hands?

Want to learn more about asking open-ended questions? Click HERE for more information.  

Provide choices

A final tool for facilitated dialogue is to provide participants with choices so that they feel empowered to consider options that may lead to positive improvements in their lives. For more on how to provide choices to participants, click HERE

Troubleshooting

There can be a downside to using facilitated dialogue. Below are some common difficulties, along with ways to get around them:

Potential Downside

Potential Solution

More likely for the dialogue to get off track

  • Start class by identifying / reviewing objectives with learners
  • Use a “bike rack” to acknowledge and remember to revisit ideas or questions
  • Make time-check announcements and remind learners about core objectives

More likely for misinformation to be shared.

  • Thank speaker for their contribution and gently correct them
  • Emphasize the worth of the speaker’s experience and ask others about their experience

Not enough time to get through the lesson objectives.

  • Move content to next class
  • Meet learners’ needs – if necessary, let an agenda item go!
  • Employ the “bike rack” strategy if you find the group straying off topic

Requires more planning and preparation.

  • Shadow great instructors to see how classes run before you start out on your own
  • Practice cooking recipes ahead of time to look for potential ways to save time during class

Quiet participants may be less likely to participate in the dialogue.

  • Involve quiet participants in other ways, such as cooking, cleaning or working in small groups

 

Now that you know about facilitated dialogue, let’s PRACTICE!

Click HERE to test your skills in asking open-ended questions.

 


Previous Topic

Next Topic

 

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