Paul and Kim

 

Paul, Kim and their children live near Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. The family learned about Cooking Matters through their Head Start center, where Kim volunteers. They signed up because they wanted to try something different.

Cooking Matters taught them about making healthier choices and saving some foods for special occasions. The family now only buys chips on game days and birthdays. “We used to buy chips all the time, like three bags every single week,” Paul says. “We also don’t drink soda anymore.”

The family learned to shop along the outer edge of the grocery store in Cooking Matters. “The healthier food is outside [the aisles],” Kim says. “I try to get the kids vegetables and fruit.”

Before Cooking Matters, the family rarely cooked from scratch. Now, Paul explains that they cook more instead of throwing something into the microwave. They often make Baked Flaked Chicken, a recipe they learned in class.

Kim and Paul like to involve the kids in meal preparation. “Cooking is helping them with math,” Kim says. As they make Baked Flaked Chicken one night, their daughter Desiree coats the chicken and son Shane shakes the pieces in a bag of breadcrumbs.

The family is making small changes to the way they eat at home: buying less junk food, cooking often and eating more fruits and vegetables. Those small changes can have a big impact on their family’s health and future.

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Paul and Kim

 

Paul, Kim and their children live near Maryland’s Chesapeake Bay. The family learned about Cooking Matters through their Head Start center, where Kim volunteers. They signed up because they wanted to try something different.

Cooking Matters taught them about making healthier choices and saving some foods for special occasions. The family now only buys chips on game days and birthdays. “We used to buy chips all the time, like three bags every single week,” Paul says. “We also don’t drink soda anymore.”

The family learned to shop along the outer edge of the grocery store in Cooking Matters. “The healthier food is outside [the aisles],” Kim says. “I try to get the kids vegetables and fruit.”

Before Cooking Matters, the family rarely cooked from scratch. Now, Paul explains that they cook more instead of throwing something into the microwave. They often make Baked Flaked Chicken, a recipe they learned in class.

Kim and Paul like to involve the kids in meal preparation. “Cooking is helping them with math,” Kim says. As they make Baked Flaked Chicken one night, their daughter Desiree coats the chicken and son Shane shakes the pieces in a bag of breadcrumbs.

The family is making small changes to the way they eat at home: buying less junk food, cooking often and eating more fruits and vegetables. Those small changes can have a big impact on their family’s health and future.

More Stories

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